Travels

Lonely Planet writer admits plagiarism and invention

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In this blog we have dedicated several articles to one of the leading travel guides in the market, Lonely planet. Even a few weeks ago, I published an interview here to one of the writers who collaborate with that editorial. Well, since everything that glitters is not gold nor is Chikiliquatre unsuitable for Eurovision, the people of Lonely Planet also invent and plagiarize what they write. Thus, as you hear it ... or read.

The Reuters agency publishes that Thomas Kohnstamm, writer of Lonely Planet who has collaborated in more than a dozen works on Brazil, Colombia, the Caribbean, South America, Venezuela and Chile, has admitted to having plagiarized and invented many of the sections included in those guides.

Kohnstamm also states in his new book Do Travel Writers Go To Hell? (Do travel writers go to hell?) Who accepted free travel in contravention of company policy. He adds that on one occasion he did not even visit the country he was writing about: I was not paid enough to go to Colombia, so I wrote the book in San Francisco. I got the information of a girl I was dating and working at the Colombian consulate. What a crack!

Lonely Planet has commented that he had reviewed Kohnstamm's work and had not found any wrong information.

A lot of card seems to me that they have. They sell 6 million copies a year and I think they should be required a minimum of control regarding these issues. The myth of the travel writer for such famous companies is marred by these things. What do you think?.

Via, msbnc

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